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Come on and join author Melissa Bradley as she sets off on her latest adventure...

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If you are not 18, please exit stage left. While there is normally nothing naughty here, I do write and review erotica so there are links to spicy stuff and the occasional heated excerpt.

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Author Stephen Tremp


Thank you Melissa for hosting me today as part of my Grand OPENING Tour! I'm looking forward to yours and your followers comments as this is an exciting topic that so many people are talking about:

"This porridge is too hot," Goldilocks exclaimed.

So she tasted the porridge from the second bowl.

"This porridge is too cold."

So she tasted the last bowl of porridge.

"Ahhh, this porridge is just right!" she said happily.

And she ate it all up.

"Goldilocks and the 3 Bears" children's story

The Goldilocks Zone: A region of space where stellar and other conditions favor life. It’s the habitable zone that’s “not too much” or “not too little” that would otherwise make conditions impossible for life. Rather, it is the zone that is “just right,” where liquid oceans and a thick atmosphere exist. Our good ol’ planet earth lies in just a Goldilocks zone, where life can not only exist, but flourish. Just take a look at our nearest neighbors who orbit outside our Goldilocks Zone. Venus (too much) is a scorched wasteland and Mars (too little) is a frozen desert. No life there at the moment.

Note: The Goldilocks Zone is being defined and fine-tuned as we discover life in extreme conditions, such as near boiling hot springs, temperatures below -60C, caves without light, water with high sulfuric acid content, and deep sea volcanic vents hot enough to melt lead. And we do not know if and how life can exist under other conditions somewhere else in the universe. Translation: Scientists are discovering life can thrive in unexpected places.

Also: The Goldilocks Zone can be misconstrued to limit our understanding for the requirements for life as the only ones for life. There may very well be other life forms that are based on silicon. And other chemical reactions may thrive in entirely different Goldilocks Zones.

BTW: The Kepler telescope (more on this amazing NASA mission in a future post) has identified 2,326 candidate planets and 139 are potentially habitable ones.

Example: On February 2, 2012,
a large, rocky planet orbiting a distant star in a "Goldilocks" zone -- not too hot and not too cold for liquid water -- is also classified as a "super Earth."

The planet orbits closely to its parent, a dwarf star that is part of a triple star system, and receives 90 percent of the sunlight Earth receives. But since most of that light is in the infrared part of the spectrum, the planet absorbs more of its energy, in the end equaling the amount of energy Earth soaks up.

According to the article in the Orange County Register, “it's close enough that a futuristic, nuclear-powered space probe could reach it in perhaps 200 years. Then the equivalent of a "smart, Droid cell phone" could start beaming back pictures. In two or three human lifetimes, the information could come back from your hardy little cell phone," he said.

Question: Do you believe there is something or someone else out there in the universe? Or are we Earthlings as goo as it gets?

“A scientific breakthrough of such magnitude it could radically alter the future of humanity—for better or worse—is in the wrong hands”

Stephen Tremp, author of the BREAKTHROUGH series, has a B.A. in information systems and an MBA degree in global management. Stephen has a background in information systems, management, and finance and draws from this varied and complex experiential knowledge to write one-of-a-kind thrillers.

His novels are enhanced by current events at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and other scientific research facilities around the world. These potential advances have the ability to change the way we perceive our universe and our place in it!

Stephen Tremp is author of the recently released suspense thriller OPENING, the second book in the BREAKTHROUGH series. You can visit Stephen at
Breakthrough Blogs for $1.99. Opening is available for download at:

Amazon for $1.99
Smashwords for $1.99



Image Credits:
Goldilocks Zone and Goldilocks


Wow! What kickass killer post! Thank you so much Stephen. You can come back here any time you want. And Opening has just moved to the top of my Must Have list.

46 comments:

  1. It's on the top of my must read list - right after my must buy Kindle list. I really need to get with the technology program...gosh, how I'll miss my rotary phone!

    Great post of Stephen's book OPENING, Melissa! And...I loved the Goldilocks Zone info...very intriguing!

    Cheers to both of you!
    Jenny @ Pearson Report
    Co-Host of the Blogging from A to Z Challenge.
    Twitter: @AprilA2Z

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  2. Mel, that's killer post, indeed.
    Great job, Stephen. I learned some new things about the universe thanks to this post. :)

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  3. Hi Melissa, Hi Stephen!

    I would like to think that there will be a Papa Bear, Mama Bear and Little Bear who will appear and demand who has been eating their porridge and sleeping on their beds! But I hope they will get to like Goldilocks in the end and share their stuff with her and she learns to not take advantage of their good and generous natures!

    :-)

    Take care
    x

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  4. @Jenny I can't wait to read Opening, either! It sounds very inrtriguing.

    The Goldilocks Zone was a great lesson in astronomy. Stephen is an amazing teacher as well as a writer.

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  5. @Nebular Thanks hon! I'm glad you enjoyed the post. I had no idea about the Goldilocks Zone, either. What a fascinating science lesson. Stephen is a great teacher and he always has such great things on his blog.

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  6. While it's too early in the morning to think about life on other planets, it's never too early to laugh at Kitty's comment!

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  7. @Kitty Hi! So glad you could stop by today. LOL That Goldilocks was a greedy, picky little girl wasn't she?

    Have a great day. :)

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  8. @Alex LOL Yes! It is way too early, but I agree, Kitty has the best humor and her comments always make me smile.

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  9. Good luck with your book Stephen and thanks for the Goldilocks lesson. If there is life on other planets living in perfect conditions I wonder if there is also a God there doing the same thing that he is doing here...Scooping out bowels of porridge.

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  10. good luck to Tremp with his new book!

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  11. Thanks Melissa for hosting me today. This is such a fascinating topic! We are discovering planets at a maddening pace. And to think we may have the ability to start beaming back pics is mind boggling and incredible.

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  12. Oh, I think there's life out there. I'm with Carl Sagan on that one. Too many billions and billions of stars...

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  13. Deep thoughts ... yikes! Alex, I saw the time stamp on your post ... that's too early to anything ... besides sleep.

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  14. Nice job Stephen! Great post...I'm writing down your book title to add to my GR reading list!

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  15. Mmmm-- Mars a frozen dessert! Oh, that's desert--sorry.
    Only 200 years to the Super Earth. Well I'd say someone needs to organize an expedition and get going.


    Lee
    Is product placement tacky?
    Tossing It Out
    Twitter: @AprilA2Z
    #atozchallenge

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  16. I've never heard that term. Interesting!

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  17. Yes, I believe there's life out there somewhere.

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  18. What a great post! I've thought a lot since my initial science loving childhood about the fact that one planet closer is too hot for us, and one planet further is too cold. It's wild that we're lucky too that we don't have a section of our trip around that would take us too far out or too far in. Great reading today Mr. Tremp - the kind that gets you thinking! And thanks to you too MB, you have the coolest guests! Cheers to both of you!

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  19. Very cool post! Great job, Stephen and Melissa. Stephen is a man of great intellect. That is certain.

    FYI: Science was my favorite subject up until about the 9th grade. I loved astronomy the most.

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  20. L.G., maybe hey're hiding from us. We could be that person that invites themselves to the party and when the host sees them coming they turns out the lights and tells everyone to be quiet.

    Christopher, yikes is right!

    Johanna, thanks! You won't be disappointed.

    Arlee, who knew Mars was edible!

    Talli, not sure who coined that term for the hunt for planets, but it stuck.

    Joel, you're not alone in that thought.

    Craig, glad you like the post! It does make you think. Better than anything on TV. Except Throught the Wormhole with Morgan Freeman.

    Matthew, I got lost along the way in high school but Science and Discover channels rekindled my fire.

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  21. I LOVE this post. Stephen you are so creative and ooze with scientific knowledge.

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  22. Hi Stephen! Hi Melissa! Great interview and peek into the scientific world. I will probably read your novel Stephen but it will challenge my unscientific self I know.

    Denise

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  23. And Stephen, you're the first blogger to charge for visits, hee hee. Work that one out! Proves I read the posts...D

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  24. I definitely believe other life is out there. This big, old universe can't be just for us. That's too bizarre and...I'd say, very arrogant of us to think so.

    There's a theory that there might be methane based bugs on Titan.

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  25. You know NASA now has a team put together to create the first generational ship for space exploration? Great post. Things are both exciting and terrifying here on the planet earth, but isn't that what makes a great story?

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  26. @Siv Now that is an interesting take concerning life on other planets. I wonder what beliefs there would be and would there be religion like we know it.

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  27. @Stephen Anytime! I'm loving this discussion. Hope you're ready for me LOL I'm not nearly as scientific with my post. :)

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  28. @L.G. Ah Carl Sagan. i used to love Cosmos. What a fantastic show. And I absolutely agree with you about the billions and billions...

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  29. @Christopher LOL Yes it was way early. I know I wish I'd been asleep and my brain was pretty fuzzy. Deep thoughts are hard to handle at that hour. Thanks for visiting and leaving a comment. ;)

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  30. @Johanna I can't wait to get Stephen's book, either.

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  31. @Arlee LOL Yes, it's about time we get off our duffs and get to organizing an intergalactic field trip. I feel lazy. ;)

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  32. @Talli This was a very cool and unusual topic. Stephen has a very orginal mind.

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  33. @Jay Hi! I agree absolutely. With all those stars and planets out there, we can't possibly be all on our own.

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  34. @Craig Thank you, sir! Stephen is a most fascinating person. It's crazy to think how close we are to being just another orbiting rock.

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  35. @Matt Astronomy was always a favorite subject of mine, too. I'm happy you enjoyed the post. Stephen is a cool, wicked smart cat.

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  36. @Ciara I'm so happy you enjoyed the post. Stephen is a terrific author and his scientific knowledge astounds me.

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  37. @L'Aussie Thank you!! I'm so happy you enjoyed Stephen's post. I was fascinated with this whole idea o Goldilocks and planets.

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  38. @MPax My fave astronomy woman! You are so right this universe is just too large for us alone. Methane based bugs in Titan? Wow! I'm going to have to check that out.

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  39. @Victoria Hi! A generational starship? Wow! Now that would make for a fascinating story, heck even series. I think that's incredibley cool of NASA.

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  40. And not only are scientists discovering life in all sorts of extreme conditions, they are constantly extending the conditions where we might find liquid water well outside the "obvious" zone. Life, and chemistry, keep surprising us.

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  41. @Botanist "Life, and chemistry, keep surprising us." Too true. Science fascinates me and I love reading about extreme environments.

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  42. I cannot believe we (Earthlings) are THE only sentient life in this vast universe. I am hoping for an afterlife that moves me forward in the future; perhaps to a time when galactic interraction is well established and is the norm.

    .....dhole

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  43. Another superb post, Mr Tremp. Thank you Melissa!

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  44. @Ellie Aww.. You are most welcome. Stephen is just amazing, isn't he?

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  45. Hi, Stephen. Another interesting guest post. I'm enjoying getting caught up on all of your tour stops. Best wishes with the sales of both of your books.

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